Cairnryan
Belfast
Ferries to Northern Ireland
Open Ticket??

Open tickets are valid for up to 12 months from booking date (see ticket conditions).

Open Ticket?

Open tickets are valid for up to 12 months from booking date (see ticket conditions).

Trip Details
Outbound
Return Trip
Cairnryan - Belfast is one of our busiest routes - sailings regularly sell out at busy periods
Tip: Don’t wait until it’s too late! Book now to secure your choice of departure time

Tips & Information for Cairnryan - Belfast

Latest offers for Cairnryan - Belfast

Cairnryan to Belfast Ferry

The Cairnryan Belfast ferry route connects Scotland with Northern Ireland. Currently there is just the 1 ferry company operating this ferry service, Stena Line. The crossing operates up to 35 times each week with sailing durations from around 2 hours 15 minutes.

Cairnryan Belfast sailing durations and frequency may vary from season to season so we’d advise doing a live check to get the most up to date information.

Cairnryan to Belfast Ferry Alternatives

For more information, please visit our Ferries from Scotland to Northern Ireland page.
Why use Direct Ferries?
category
Ferries from 3325 routes and 764 ports worldwide
category
Trusted by over 2.5 million customers
category
We arrange over 1.2 million ferry crossings / year
category
We check up to 1 million prices for our customers daily

Cairnryan Belfast Ferry reviews

  • "Efficient service and crossing"

    Both journeys were very efficient. Food was very good and bonus of free refills on hot drinks. Would definitely use this service again.

    'Superfast VII' travelled on Superfast VII

    Read More Read Less
  • "Great"

    Loved it- short crossings, polite staff and quick and efficient at the ports. Shop was nice and there was plenty of seating. We left early as everyone arrived early for both crossings.

    'Superfast VII' travelled on Superfast VII

    Read More Read Less
  • "Really great experience"

    We travelled on late evening crossings between Cairnryan and Belfast. Arrival was fast, efficient and simple, with friendly and helpful staff. The ferry itself we really enjoyed, with plenty of chairs and space to relax and rest and the free cinema for my children. We would absolutely repeat this experience.

    'Superfast VII' travelled on Superfast VII

    Read More Read Less
  • "Peasant journey"

    Stena made our trip to NI very much part of the holiday. The lounge facility is very good value since you get away before the lorries block the roads. The facilities are similar to airport business lounges with good drinks and snacks. A Menu for meals is also an option. Compared to P&O this is a much more pleasant experience with lots of good seats and room to move around within the lounge even with its own toilets. Full marks for managing the vehicles so all in all a great trip.

    'Superfast VII' travelled on Superfast VII

    Read More Read Less

Cairnryan Guide

Cairnryan is a Scottish port village located in Dumfries and Galloway, lying on the eastern shore of Loch Ryan. Important in maritime history, Cairnryan has two ferry terminals connecting Scotland to Northern Ireland. The first opened in 1973, originally operated by Townsend Thoresen and now by P&O Ferries, links Scotland with the port of Larne. The second Cairnryan ferry terminal is located at Old House Point, operated by Stena Line, linking to the Port of Belfast.

The village can trace its origins back to 1701 when it was established for workers employed on the Lochryan Estate which features a deer park and bowling green. Facilities in Cairnryan include the Lochryan Hotel, a few guest houses and bed and breakfast establishments, a caravan site built on the site of an old war campsite, a village shop and The Merchant's House Restaurant.


Belfast Guide

Belfast Harbour is an important seaport in the United Kingdom, with one of the leading ferry operators, Stena Line, connecting it with Liverpool and Cairnryan. You can also reach Belfast from the Isle of Man, with seasonal services provided by Steam Packet.

Belfast is Northern Ireland's capital city, surrounded by mountains creating a specific climate beneficial to horticulture. Moreover, it lies at the mouth of the River Lagan located in County Antrim, although parts of east and south Belfast are actually located in County Down. It is, then, quite a green space and offers visitors plenty of parkland and forest parks to explore from Cave Hill Country Park and Lagan Valley Regional Park to the Victorian Botanic Gardens in the heart of the city.

From an architectural perspective Belfast has some fine buildings including the Edwardian City Hall and the modern Waterfront Hall. Many of the city's Victorian landmarks, including the main Lanyon Building at Queen's University Belfast and the Linenhall Library, were designed by Sir Charles Lanyon.


The quickest way to make & manage your booking

Download the Direct Ferries app or manage your booking online through My Account

App

Customer Service

Visit our customer service page to find useful information on travelling by ferry, our FAQs, and how to contact us for help with your booking