Algeciras - Ceuta is one of our busiest routes - sailings regularly sell out at busy periods
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Algeciras Ceuta Ferry reviews

  • "Great trip"

    Great trip across the Med. Check-in at Ceuta was particularly helpful.

    'Passio per Formentera' travelled on Passio per Formentera

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  • "Very helpful staff "

    On time , comfortable and helpful staff

    'Avemar Dos' travelled on Avemar Dos

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  • "Avoid Ceuta customs"

    After customs, everything was perfect, tkx transmediterranea, but go by tanger med, avoid Ceuta. 4 hours to pass border....

    '' travelled on

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  • "Good trip"

    Went on a round day trip from Algeciras to Ceuta as a pedestrian passenger. The ferry was punctually on time and the trip was fast and pleasant. Facilities on the ferry were good.

    'Passio per Formentera' travelled on Passio per Formentera

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Algeciras Guide

Located on the Bay of Gibralta in Spain, the port city of Algeciras is located in the south of Spain and is mainly a transport hub and industrial city. The port plays an important role in the city's economy as it is the main embarkation point between Spain and Tangier as well as to other ports in Morocco and to the Canary Islands. The city is a large fishing industry and also exports many of its locally produced products, including cereals, tobacco and livestock. The city is quite popular with tourists although it can't be described as a particularly beautiful city although it does have a gritty charm and has managed to retain a real port atmosphere, perhaps unlike many other Spanish resorts.

The city's port is one of the largest in Europe and also in the world in three categories: transhipment, cargo and container, and is located around 20 km to the north east of Tarifa on the Rio de la Miel, the southernmost river on the Iberian Peninsular and on continental Europe. Visitors can also, from time to time, see whales and dolphins swim close to the port.


Ceuta Guide

Ceuta is one of two Spanish exclaves in North Africa (the other one being Melilla). Ceuta had several rulers before the Portuguese assumed control of the city in 1415. However, the city has been under Spanish administration since 1580 although it has the status of an autonomous city despite being located on the African continent and lies almost directly to the south of the autonomous city of Gibraltar. Popular sites in the city include the Royal Walls and the Mediterranean Maritime Park.

For visitors keen on water sports, Ceuta's coast is definitely a place to visit where you will be able to paddle in a kayak or take an organised trip on a boat for a spot of turtle, whale and dolphin watching. The city's coast is especially popular with scuba divers as the waters in the region, where Atlantic Ocean waters meet the Mediterranean Sea, are filled with flora and fauna.

From the city's port, ferry services operate to the Spanish mainland.