Sark - Jersey is one of our busiest routes - sailings regularly sell out at busy periods
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Sark - Jersey Ferry Operators

    • 3 Sailings Weekly 1 hour 10 min
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Sark Guide

The island of Sark is one of the Channel Islands which are located in the south west English Channel, off the coast of Normandy, France. The island forms part of the Bailiwick of Guernsey, and is a Royal fief. The island has its own Parliament and its own set of laws which are based on Norman law. The island is also relatively unique in that it is one of the few places in the world where cars are not permitted on its roads. The main forms of transport around the island are tractors or horse-drawn vehicles. The journey from the town's quay to the village up the hill can either be made on foot or on the "toast rack", the tractor drawn bus.

The Isle of Sark Shipping Company operates small ferries from Sark to St Peter Port in Guernsey. The crossing takes 45 minutes for the 14 km journey. A high-speed passenger ferry also operates in the summer to Jersey. Also a 12-passenger boat, the Lady Maris II, operates regular services to Alderney.


Jersey Guide

Jersey is a British crown dependency in the English Channel off the coast of Normandy. Along with the Guernsey it forms the grouping known as the Channel Islands.
The defence of all these islands is the responsibility of the United Kingdom. However, Jersey is not part of the UK, nor the European Union, but is rather a separate possession of the Crown.
Jersey’s prehistoric period produced a rich legacy of artefacts. Remnants of a great French forest that existed over 10,000 years ago, when the Island was part of the continent can still be seen today at St Ouen when there is a low tide. Flints and crude stone tools were left by hunters in La Cotte a la Chevre (Goat’s cave) now perched 60 feet (18 m) above the sea level on the north coast of St Ouen and La Cotte de St Brelade is one of the most important Palaeolithic sites in Europe.