Carteret - Jersey is one of our busiest routes - sailings regularly sell out at busy periods
Tip: Don’t wait until it’s too late! Book now to secure your choice of departure time

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Carteret - Jersey Ferry Operators

    • 3 Sailings Weekly 1 hour 5 min
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Carteret Jersey Ferry reviews

  • "Day Trip"

    My wife and I had always wanted to visit Jersey, as we passed the island every year for the last 50 years. Due to circumstances, we came to Cherbourg this year and took advantage of the one day sailing. It was all worth while. Parking was no problem. Staff, were excellent and friendly. Sailing was very smooth. We had a full day in St Helier, which was also great and it’s residents also very friendly. Money well spent. Wilson

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  • "Many waves"

    If you easily get seasick, it is not advisable to make this trip. In the morning, the sea is not very calm. Everything else is neatly arranged and there is enough space on board to sit and relax together. We were four in total and by morning, we had already taken a great tour which helped tremendously. The ship left on time, there's enough to eat and drink on board, if your stomach can handle it! Less waves on the return trip to the relief of my daughters!

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Carteret Guide

The town and port of Carteret is a popular coastal resort located in the north west of France. The town, which can trace its history back to Roman times, evolved into a resort during the Belle Epoque, when seaside holidays became the vogue. Declared a "tourist town" in 1921, Carteret since 1995 has been recognised as having a Blue Flag beach which is a designation awarded to coastal areas adhering to specific environmental standards. In 1965, the towns of Barneville-sure-Mer and Carteret were merged to form one municipality.

Sometimes referred to as the 'port of isles', the Port of Carteret is the present port of Barneville-Carteret and is located on the right bank of the mouth of the Gerfleur River, at the end of Cape Carteret. The large pier and south dike were completed in 1880; the following year, a ferry began service to Jersey. In 1945 the small port, used as a shelter for fishermen during spring tide, was enlarged with the help of combat engineers from the American 280th Battalion stationed in Carteret.


Jersey Guide

Jersey is a British crown dependency in the English Channel off the coast of Normandy. Along with the Guernsey it forms the grouping known as the Channel Islands.
The defence of all these islands is the responsibility of the United Kingdom. However, Jersey is not part of the UK, nor the European Union, but is rather a separate possession of the Crown.
Jersey’s prehistoric period produced a rich legacy of artefacts. Remnants of a great French forest that existed over 10,000 years ago, when the Island was part of the continent can still be seen today at St Ouen when there is a low tide. Flints and crude stone tools were left by hunters in La Cotte a la Chevre (Goat’s cave) now perched 60 feet (18 m) above the sea level on the north coast of St Ouen and La Cotte de St Brelade is one of the most important Palaeolithic sites in Europe.