Agios Kirikos to Kavala Ferry

The Agios Kirikos Kavala ferry route connects Ikaria with Greece. Currently there is just the 1 ferry company operating this ferry service, Hellenic Seaways. The crossing operates up to 2 times each week with sailing durations from around 17 hours 20 minutes.

Agios Kirikos Kavala sailing durations and frequency may vary from season to season so we’d advise doing a live check to get the most up to date information.

Route and port details

Agios Kirikos - Kavala Ferry Operators

  • Hellenic Seaways
    • 2 Sailings Weekly 17 hr 20 min
    • Get price

Average Agios Kirikos Kavala Prices

Prices shown represent the average one way price paid by our customers. The most common booking on the Agios Kirikos Kavala route is a car and 2 passengers.

Agios Kirikos Guide

Agios Kirykos is a town located on the Greek island of Ikaria which lies in the North Aegean Sea. Located in the village of Kambos is the Archaeological Museum, which is situated on a hill which was once the ancient fortress of Oinoe. The museum has many artefacts for visitors to see including Neolithic tools, pottery, clay statuettes, coins, carved headstones and columns. Next to the museum is Agia Irini, the island's oldest church.

The island, which derives its name from Icarus, the son of Daedalus in Greek mythology, is connected by ferry to the Greek ports of Piraeus and Rafina. ferry connections are also available to the Cycladic islands of Syros, Tinos, Mykonos and Andros and also to the islands of Rhodes and Ikaria. Journey times vary between around 5 and 10 hours depending on ferry type and route.

Kavala Guide

The Greek city of Kavala is the capital and main port of the Kavala region and is built on the slopes of Mount Symvolo, and is regarded as one of the most picturesque cities in Greece. By analysing the archaeological artefacts found, the city is able to trace its history back to Prehistoric times. The city's original centre was restricted to the Panayia district which has been inhabited since the 7th century BC. At the beginning of the 16th century the city expanded and managed to maintain its new borders until 1870 although the city as can be seen today only really began to form after 1928.

The cities fortunes were in large part a result of its important location, its port and to its natural defences on the peninsular, on which the old city was built. Wandering around the city visitors will be struck by its neoclassical mansions and large tobacco warehouses which are a physical symbol of the city's recent past. In the “Mecca of tobacco” as Kavala was named in the past, thousands of tobacco workers earned their living.

From the city's port ferries operate to Agios Efstratios, Limnos, Lavrio, Kirikos, Chios, Karlovassi, Psara, Vathi and Mytilene.