Sitia - Milos is one of our busiest routes - sailings regularly sell out at busy periods
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Sitia Guide

The port town of Sita is located on the Greek island of Crete which lies in the Aegean Sea. On the island, Sita is to the east of Agios Nikolaos and to the north east of Lerapetra. The town is generally not much visited by tourists and is not particularly well developed and can trace its history back to Minoan times. Excavations have been unearthed in the neighbouring site of Petras which date back to the end of the Neolithic period, 3,000 BC through to the Bronze Age, 3,000 - 1,050 BC. In support of the Petras findings, excavations at other archaeological sites on the island, such as Itanos and Mochlos, have found artefacts from Minoan times. Petras has, over its history, also been under the control of the Venetians who used it as a base for their eastern Mediterranean operations. The site was destroyed by an earthquake in 1508, and again by pirates in 1538 and by the Venetians in 1651.

The port at Sitia connects Sitia and eastern Crete with several other Greek islands as well as with the port of Piraeus on the Greek mainland. The town also has a marina which accommodates smaller fishing boats and yachts.


Milos Guide

Milos is a Greek island that is the most westerly of the Cyclades group of islands and is known as the place the statue of Venus, or Aphrodite, was discovered, although the statue is now on display in the Louvre Museum in Paris. The island has around 5,000 residents that live in seven small villages dotted around the island. Unlike many of its Cycladic neighbours, tourism is a relatively recent innovation on Milos and now tourists visit to enjoy the island's lovely beaches and warm, crystal clear waters. Thanks to the island's natural landscape, which is of volcanic origins, it is sometimes referred to as 'the island of colours'.

The island is connected to the port of Piraeus in Athens, to all of the Cycladic islands, the Dodecanese islands and Crete with both ferries and high-speed catamarans. During the peak season in the summer there are daily scheduled routes to and from the island. There are two ports in Milos, the main port is in Adamas and the other port is in Apollonia which connects the island with the islands of Kimolos and Glaronissia.