Santander to Cork Ferry

The Santander Cork ferry route connects Spain with Ireland. Currently there is just the 1 ferry company operating this ferry service, Brittany Ferries. The crossing operates up to 1 times each week with sailing durations from around 26 hours 30 minutes.

Santander Cork sailing durations and frequency may vary from season to season so we’d advise doing a live check to get the most up to date information.

Santander - Cork Ferry Operators

  • Brittany Ferries
    • 1 Sailing Weekly 26 hr 30 min
    • Get price

Average Santander Cork Prices

Prices shown represent the average one way price paid by our customers. The most common booking on the Santander Cork route is a car and 2 passengers.

Santander Guide

The Spanish city and port of Santander is the capital of the autonomous community and historical region of Cantabria on the north coast of Spain and lies to the east of Gijon and to the west of Bilbao. Popular tourist attractions in the city include the Cathedral of Santander, the lower temple (the "cripta del Cristo") was built in the 12th century on earlier Roman buildings. Its architectural style is a transition from Romanesque to Gothic. The upper church was built between the 13th and 14 the centuries.

Santander's port transports around 150,000 passengers each year to the ports of Plymouth and Portsmouth in the United Kingdom. The crossing time to Portsmouth is around 24 hours and 20 hours to Plymouth. The port has excellent road and rail facilities that provide good links with Portugal, the Spanish Costa's and other parts of Spain. Passenger facilities in the port include banks, supermarkets, a restaurant, tourist information desk and a souvenir shop.

Cork Guide

The Irish city and port of Cork is located in the south west of Ireland and is the second largest city in Ireland and the third most populous city on the island of Ireland. It is located on the banks of the River Lee which divides into two channels as it approaches the western edge of the city. To the east of the city, where the two channels meet again and continue to flow on to Lough Mahon and Cork Harbour, are the city's quays. The city itself is located on the island that is created by the River Lee when it splits and then merges again.

Architecturally, Cork has a number of notable buildings that date back to medieval period through to the present day, although the only surviving medieval building is the Red Abbey. The city's two cathedrals are popular tourist attractions. St. Mary's Cathedral, sometimes called the North Cathedral, is the Catholic cathedral and work began on it in 1808 with its tower added in the 1860's. St. Fin Barre's Cathedral is the Protestant cathedral in the city and was built on the site of an earlier chapel. Work began on this cathedral in 1862 and was completed in 1879 under the direction of the architect William Burges.