Milos to Chania Ferry

The Milos Chania ferry route connects Cyclades Islands with Crete. Currently there is just the 1 ferry company operating this ferry service, Minoan Lines. The crossing operates up to 3 times each week with sailing durations from around 3 hours 45 minutes.

Milos Chania sailing durations and frequency may vary from season to season so we’d advise doing a live check to get the most up to date information.

Milos - Chania Ferry Operators

  • Minoan Lines
    • 3 Sailings Weekly 3 hr 45 min
    • Get price

Milos Guide

Located in the Aegean Sea, to the north of the Sea of Crete, and forming part of the Cyclades group of islands, the island of Milos is perhaps most famous for the statue of Aphrodite (the "Venus de Milo" which is now on display at the Louvre Gallery in Paris). The island is also known for the statues of the Greek god Asclepius, now on display at the British Museum in London, and the Poseidon and an archaic Apollo in Athens. Clustered around the little port of Adamas are a number of little shops that sell souvenirs and trinkets, handmade gifts and jewellery along with locally produced weaving, embroidery and food products.

The island is connected by ferry to the port of Piraeus in Athens, to all of the other Cycladic islands, the Dodecanese islands and Crete with both conventional ferry and high speed catamarans. During the summer months there are daily scheduled services to and from the island. The island's other port is in Apollonia which also connects the island to the islands of Kimolos and Glaranissia.

Chania Guide

Chania, the second largest city on the Greek island of Crete is a city that has hosted many different civilisations during its history. The city is built on the area of Minoan Kidonia, at the end of the Homonym Gulf between the Akrotiri and Onicha peninsulas, and was the former capital city of Crete between 1847 and 1972. Today it is the second largest city on Crete after Heraklion and is the capital of the Homonym prefecture. The Old Town's maze of alleys and streets are lined with beautiful Venetian mansions, churches, fountains and historical monuments which are all popular with visitors.

The Venetian port lies at the heart of the old town and is where visitors can still see Venetian buildings sit alongside Turkish buildings that were built later. On the east of Palea Poli is Splantzia district which is built on the site of the former Turkish district and is where you will find Aghii Anargiri Church, which is the only Orthodox church which had received permission to operate during the Venetian and Turkish occupations of the island. Also in the area is Sintrivani Square. The Neoria district of the city is where the former port was located and is also where Venetian shipyards were located in the 14th and 16th centuries.

From the port, ferry services connect Chania to the port of Piraeus, the Cycladic Islands and to the Dodecanese Islands.