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Chalki - Kasos Ferry Operators

    • 3 Sailings Weekly 5 hr 10 min
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Chalki Guide

Located in the Dodecanese group of islands, the Greek island of Halki lies in the Aegean Sea and is the smallest inhabited island in the Dodecanese. Lying around 6 km to the west of the island of Rhodes, Halki has managed to retain much of its natural charm as it has not developed, so far, into much of a tourist destination. The island, with its relaxing beaches and beautiful architecture make it an ideal destination for those visitors seeking peace and privacy. Few beaches in Halki are organized and can be accessed on foot or by bus. The rest of the beaches on the island are totally secluded.

There is an abandoned village in the centre of the island which is overlooked by a medieval castle. The village was abandoned when piracy was confronted in the Aegean Sea and therefore the village's inhabitants began to move to the area around the port.

The island is connected by conventional ferry and Highspeed ferries to the port of Piraeus and the rest of the Dodecanese islands. It is also possible to take a ferry to the Cycladic islands and to Crete via other ports.


Kasos Guide

The Greek island of Kasos is the most southerly of the Dodecanese group of islands and has a history that is closely associated with the nearby island of Crete. The island's first inhabitants are thought to have been the Phoenicians, while Homer included the island as one of the islands that participated in the Trojan War. The small island had a significant naval presence and used its fleet to take part in the Revolution in 1821 which unfortunately resulted in its complete destruction by the Turks in 1824.

The island's more recent history is linked to the rest of the islands in the Dodecanese until they were all unified with Greece in 1948. Many of island's residents, and those of Karpathos, emigrated to America and Egypt, where they worked on the construction of the Suez Canal in the middle of the 19th century.

Kasos can be reached by ferry from Piraeus, Crete (Siteia, Aghios Nikolaos), Rhodes, Halki and Karpathos.