Milos to Heraklion Ferry

The Anek Lines Milos Heraklion ferry crossing between Cyclades Islands and Crete is the only service operating on this route. With crossing durations from 10 hours 20 minutes, the route is scheduled to run around 1 time per week.

The regularity and duration of crossing varies from time to time so it is advisable to get a live quote for current availability.

Route and port details

Milos to Heraklion Ferry Alternatives

For more information, please visit our Ferries from Cyclades Islands to Crete page.

Milos - Heraklion Ferry Operators

  • Anek Lines
    • 1 Sailing Weekly 10 hr 20 min
    • Get price

Milos Guide

Located in the Aegean Sea, to the north of the Sea of Crete, and forming part of the Cyclades group of islands, the island of Milos is perhaps most famous for the statue of Aphrodite (the "Venus de Milo" which is now on display at the Louvre Gallery in Paris). The island is also known for the statues of the Greek god Asclepius, now on display at the British Museum in London, and the Poseidon and an archaic Apollo in Athens. Clustered around the little port of Adamas are a number of little shops that sell souvenirs and trinkets, handmade gifts and jewellery along with locally produced weaving, embroidery and food products.

The island is connected by ferry to the port of Piraeus in Athens, to all of the other Cycladic islands, the Dodecanese islands and Crete with both conventional ferry and high speed catamarans. During the summer months there are daily scheduled services to and from the island. The island's other port is in Apollonia which also connects the island to the islands of Kimolos and Glaranissia.

Heraklion Guide

Located on the Greek island of Crete, Heraklion is the island's largest city and is one of the main urban centres in Greece. The city can trace its history back to at least the 9th century AD when its development began and then later came under the influence of the Arabs, the Venetians and the Ottomans. Popular sites in the city with tourists include the fortification walls that are essentially the boundary of the old city. These were first built by the Arabs and then reinforced by the Venetians. From the seven bastions, only the Martinengo bastion survives to this day and is where visitors will find the tomb of the renowned writer N. Kazantzakis, overlooking the city. The city was also a venue during the 2004 Olympic Games, and hosted games of the football tournament.

Located in the city's old port, visitors can still see the vaulted tarsanades where ships used to be built and also the 16th century Koule Fortress. From the port, ferries depart to destinations including Santorini, Ios, Paros, Mykonos and Rhodes. There are also ferry services to the Greek mainland port of Piraeus.