Patmos to Fournoi Ferry

The Patmos Fournoi ferry route connects Dodecanese Islands with Aegean Islands and is currently operated by 2 ferry companies. The Dodekanisos Seaways service runs up to 3 times per week with a sailing duration of around 45 minutes while the Hellenic Seaways service runs up to 2 times per week with a duration from 2 hr 15 min.

So that’s a combined 5 sailings on offer per week on the Patmos Fournoi route between Dodecanese Islands and Aegean Islands. Compare now and get the best fare at the time that you want to travel.

Route and port details

Patmos - Fournoi Ferry Operators

  • Dodekanisos Seaways
    • 3 Sailings Weekly 45 min
    • Get price
  • Hellenic Seaways
    • 2 Sailings Weekly 2 hr 15 min
    • Get price

Patmos Guide

Located in the Aegean Sea, the Greek island of Patmos is part of the Dodecanese group of islands. It is one of the most northerly islands in the Dodecanese and lies just off the west coast of Turkey. Patmos' capital is the town of Chora and its port is in the town of Skala. The island, which is also known as the "island of the Apocalypse" is popular with tourists from around the world. However, there is more to the island than this. It is a pretty island with traditional whitewashed houses, crystal clear waters, excellent food and a thriving nightlife.

The Cave of the Apocalypse, a major visitor attraction, is reputedly to have been the cave where Saint Ioannis heard the voice of God and wrote the Apocalypse. In the cave, visitors can see the cross engraved by Saint Ioannis along with three small cracks on the rock through which the voice of God came, symbolising the Holy Trinity.

Patmos is connected by ferry to Piraeus, the other islands of the Dodecanese, and also with other islands of the Aegean Sea, like Samos and Ikaria. The ferry from Piraeus takes about 7 hours to reach the port of Patmos. The journey to the nearby islands of the Dodecanese take about 1-1.5 hours, while the trips from Ikaria or Samos take a little longer.

Fournoi Guide

Fournoi is a Greek island that lies in the north Aegean Sea and is situated between the islands of Ikaria, Samos and Patmos. The island's long history is evidenced by the many ancient finds that are dotted around the island that date back to the Ionians, Classical and Hellenistic times. Included in the finds are the cyclopean Wall with signs of an Acropolis on the Hill of Ai Giorgis, the ruins of the ancient temple at Kamari and the remains of homes on the sea bed, the shrine of Poseidon at Agia Triada in Chryssomilia. The island's many hidden beaches and small inlets was a haven for pirates during the Middle Ages as their ships could be easily hidden. In fact, at one point the island was named "Corseoi Island" after Corsairs (pirates).

The island's main village is Campos and has a number of tavernas, patisseries, shops selling traditional products and bakeries (fournoi in Greek) to greet visitors.