Naxos to Heraklion Ferry

The Naxos Heraklion ferry route connects Cyclades Islands with Crete and is currently operated by 2 ferry companies. The Sea Jets service runs up to 7 times per week with a sailing duration of around 3 hours 40 minutes while the Hellenic Seaways service runs up to 3 times per week with a duration from 3 hr 10 min.

So that’s a combined 10 sailings on offer per week on the Naxos Heraklion route between Cyclades Islands and Crete. Compare now and get the best fare at the time that you want to travel.

Naxos - Heraklion Ferry Operators

  • Sea Jets
    • 7 Sailings Weekly 3 hr 40 min
    • Get price
  • Hellenic Seaways
    • 3 Sailings Weekly 3 hr 10 min
    • Get price

Naxos Guide

The Greek island of Naxos is part of the Cyclades group of islands that lie in the Aegean Sea. Naxos City, or Chora, is the island's largest town and capital and is built amphitheatrically on the island's west coast. It is also home to one of the biggest ports in the Aegean Sea. The town is popular with tourists and as a result there are many bars, restaurants and cafes to cater for them. The small island of Palatia, which extends from the mainland of Naxos, is the town's emblem. Located on the small island is Portara, which is a monument resembling a door standing alone, without any walls attached to either side. A visit to Portara is advisable, especially after your swim, whilst the sun is setting.

The island is also well known for its food and for producing the famous Naxian potatoes, wine, Kitron liquor productions and the popular cheese called Graviera. There are many restaurants located throughout the island serving local produce to the many tourists who visit.

From the island's port ferries depart to Piraeus (Athens) and to the other islands in the Cyclades.

Heraklion Guide

Located on the Greek island of Crete, Heraklion is the island's largest city and is one of the main urban centres in Greece. The city can trace its history back to at least the 9th century AD when its development began and then later came under the influence of the Arabs, the Venetians and the Ottomans. Popular sites in the city with tourists include the fortification walls that are essentially the boundary of the old city. These were first built by the Arabs and then reinforced by the Venetians. From the seven bastions, only the Martinengo bastion survives to this day and is where visitors will find the tomb of the renowned writer N. Kazantzakis, overlooking the city. The city was also a venue during the 2004 Olympic Games, and hosted games of the football tournament.

Located in the city's old port, visitors can still see the vaulted tarsanades where ships used to be built and also the 16th century Koule Fortress. From the port, ferries depart to destinations including Santorini, Ios, Paros, Mykonos and Rhodes. There are also ferry services to the Greek mainland port of Piraeus.