Milos to Syros Ferry

The Milos Syros ferry route connects Cyclades Islands with Cyclades Islands. Currently there is just the 1 ferry company operating this ferry service, Hellenic Seaways. The crossing operates up to 4 times each week with sailing durations from around 5 hours 10 minutes.

Milos Syros sailing durations and frequency may vary from season to season so we’d advise doing a live check to get the most up to date information.

Route and port details

Milos - Syros Ferry Operators

  • Hellenic Seaways
    • 4 Sailings Weekly 5 hr 10 min
    • Get price

Milos Guide

Located in the Aegean Sea, to the north of the Sea of Crete, and forming part of the Cyclades group of islands, the island of Milos is perhaps most famous for the statue of Aphrodite (the "Venus de Milo" which is now on display at the Louvre Gallery in Paris). The island is also known for the statues of the Greek god Asclepius, now on display at the British Museum in London, and the Poseidon and an archaic Apollo in Athens. Clustered around the little port of Adamas are a number of little shops that sell souvenirs and trinkets, handmade gifts and jewellery along with locally produced weaving, embroidery and food products.

The island is connected by ferry to the port of Piraeus in Athens, to all of the other Cycladic islands, the Dodecanese islands and Crete with both conventional ferry and high speed catamarans. During the summer months there are daily scheduled services to and from the island. The island's other port is in Apollonia which also connects the island to the islands of Kimolos and Glaranissia.

Syros Guide

The Greek island of Syros is one of the Cyclades group of islands and is unusual in that the island's architecture is more medieval rather than the more typical Cycladic. The island's capital is Ermoupolis and has some fine examples of Venetian mansions to see. In the Vaporia quarter of the capital visitors will find some lovely large churches and impressive neoclassical buildings, such as the Town Hall and Apollo Theatre in the central square. Also popular with visitors are the island's beaches which are well equipped for tourists and have a good range of facilities.

The island can trace its history back to the 3rd millennium BC where signs of inhabitation have been found in the Halandriani and Kastri parts of the island. Artefacts found indicate that there was some kind of metal workshop on the island which possibly had a trading relationship with Asia Minor. The Samians occupied the island in the 6th century BC and is when many of the island's inhabitants moved to the island. At that time, the important physician and philosopher Pherecydis was born in Syros and some years later he went to Samos and became the teacher of Pythagoras.