Milazzo to Alicudi Ferry

The Milazzo Alicudi ferry route connects Sicily with Aeolian Islands and is currently operated by 2 ferry companies. The Liberty Lines service runs up to 3 times per day with a sailing duration of around 2 hours 45 minutes while the Siremar service runs up to 5 times per week with a duration from 5 hr 5 min.

So that’s a combined 26 sailings on offer per week on the Milazzo Alicudi route between Sicily and Aeolian Islands. Compare now and get the best fare at the time that you want to travel.

Milazzo - Alicudi Ferry Operators

  • Liberty Lines
    • 3 Sailings Daily 2 hr 45 min
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  • Siremar
    • 5 Sailings Weekly 5 hr 5 min
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Average Milazzo Alicudi Prices

Prices shown represent the average one way price paid by our customers. The most common booking on the Milazzo Alicudi route is a car and 1 passenger.

Milazzo Guide

The Sicilian city of Milazzo is the third largest city in the Province of Messina and has a population of around 32,000. Located around 40 km from Sicily's capital, Milazzo is situated at the base of the peninsular that protrudes into the Tyrrhenian Sea. An important and popular sight in the city is the Castle of Milazzo, the building of which is believed to have been started by the Arabs and then enlarged by the Normans and restored by Frederick II. The castle's walls have round towers on them and also a 14th century Gothic portal. Other interesting sights include the Church of Our Lady of Mount Carmel, the Rock Church of St Anthony of Padua, the Sanctuary of St Francis of Paola and the Baroque Church of the Holy Crucifix.

From the port of Milazzo ferries depart to the Aeolian Islands and Naples.

Alicudi Guide

The Italian island of Alicudi in one of the Aeolian Islands which is located off the coast of Sicily and mainland Italy. It is the most remote of the Aeolian Islands and also has the island group's smallest population, with around 100 inhabitants. The island's only form of transport are its donkeys which can frequently be heard braying. Because of the island's small population, and size, and because its tourist infrastructure is perhaps not as well developed as some of its neighbours, it has managed to retain a great deal of its rugged, authentic charm. The island's simplicity is an attraction for certain types of visitors; adventurers, artists and writers.

The island is actually a volcanic cone protruding from the sea which is now covered in vegetation and extinct. There are a number of footpaths, that begin from the little port on the island, that climb the island's steep slopes, passing cultivated terraces. Formerly, the island was called Ericusa which derives from the heather (Erica) that grows on the island's slopes. Some of the island's houses are well maintained and some are abandoned and are mainly located in the east of the island as the island's western slopes are steep and inaccessible.

There are scheduled ferry services to Alicudi from the other Aeolian Islands, from Sicily and from the Italian mainland.