Italy

Compare ferries from Italy to Corsica

There are numerous ferry crossings operating from Italy to Corsica. Ferries currently connect 4 ports in Italy with 3 ports in Corsica.

There are a combined number of 61 ferry crossings each week across a selection of 7 Ferry Routes which are operated by 2 ferry companies including Corsica Sardinia Ferries & Moby Lines with the shortest crossing taking around 2 hours 15 minutes (Piombino to Bastia).

This is a general summary of the services on offer between Italy and Corsica, for live information select from our Fare Search.

Italy Corsica Ferry Map

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About Italy:

Italy is home to the greatest number of UNESCO World Heritage Sites in the world. Together with Greece, it is known as the birthplace of Western culture.

Full of high art and monuments, almost every small village in Italy offers a few interesting locations. From the Roman ruins, Byzantine cities and Renaissance masterpieces to cobblestone streets, beautiful churches and wide variety of stunning beaches, Italy is a place that provides rare experiences that can never be overrated.

Italy is the ideal departure country for those travelling by ferry with numerous amazing destinations, many of them domestic on offer. With so many miles of coastline and famous islands to choose from, the list of destinations is truly unrivalled. In terms of international travel, Italy is connected to almost all of the countries in the Adriatic Sea as well as featuring numerous links to Greece, Tunisia and Spain.

The short island crossings are usually made with small passenger vessels while the longer international journeys are operated by luxurious cruise ferries.

About Corsica:

Corsica is a Mediterranean island, situated west of Italy, south of the French mainland and immediately north of Sardinia.

Its stunning 1,000 km coastline has over 200 beaches, whilst the inland offers a mix of mountain scenery, awesome valleys and idyllic hilltop towns, so you can see why the locals nicknamed it ‘the island of beauty’.

Although belonging to France, Corsica has a unique feel to it. This is perhaps most evident in the local dialect and the cultural obsession with flute instruments. However, drawing similarities with the mainland, Corsicans also love fine food and wine, especially fresh seafood and charcuterie.

Along the coastline are multiple ports, and, thanks to the island’s convenient location in the Mediterranean Sea, it’s within reach from the French mainland, Italy and the surrounding islands. There's plenty of choice, too, with frequent routes provided by many different ferry companies.